Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal unveils education reform plan


Here are the details on: Bobby Jindal’s new education plan, from New Orleans Online Access.

Excerpt:

: Gov. Bobby Jindal: on Tuesday outlined a far-reaching set of proposals aimed at improving education in Louisiana, including a state-wide voucher program for low-income students, an expansion of autonomous charter schools and steps to link a teachers’ classroom performance to their job protections and their compensation. The governor has been: promising for months now: to make education reform the centerpiece of his second-term agenda.

[...]The voucher program may prove the most controversial aspect of the plan. Jindal is proposing to help pay tuition at private and parochial schools for any child of a low-income family who attends a school that receives a letter grade of C, D or F.

More than 70 percent of Louisiana’s public schools would fall into that category, opening up districts across the state to competition for public funding from private institutions. Parents who opt out of those public schools would be able to take the public funding set aside for their child with them to pay for tuition.

Voucher opponents argue that offering private school tuition siphons money away from public education, but the governor is framing the idea as a way to put decision-making in the hands of parents.

Also toward that end, Jindal is proposing to fast-track the approval of new charter schools for proven charter operators. Charters are publicly funded but privately managed and typically: overseen by nonprofit boards. They compete with traditional public schools in their area for students.

Jindal is also proposing to: end regular annual pay increases for teachers: based on years in the classroom, ban the use of seniority in all personnel decisions and weaken the power that local school boards have in hiring and firing decisions in favor of superintendents.

Teachers coming into the classroom for the first time would also see major changes under Jindal’s plan: districts would have greater flexibility to establish their own pay scales for new teachers and tenure would be set aside only for those who earn high ratings on evaluations five years in a row.

I thought it might be helpful to also post this quick introduction to the issue of school choice, from the Cato Institute.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TIGmU2wJm-A]

I don’t agree with the Cato Institute on everything, but they’re right on this issue. The Heritage Foundation also has: 3 small cartoons explaining school choice.

There’s: an even longer video narrated by John Stossel: that you can watch, that really explains the why school reform matters – and why it’s a conservative issue. Like: the sex-selection abortion issue: that I blogged about here before, this is an issue that conservatives need to seize on. Here, we can really let our compassionate side show by helping the poorest students, especially those in visible minorities, who simply cannot get a quality education in a public school monopoly that is not responsive to the needs of parents, or their children. This is an issue where we can win – the only losers are the educational bureaucrats and the teacher unions. But the kids are more important.

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