Deployed Navy Dad to Lose Daughter Because he Can’t Attend Court Custody Hearing on Submarine


Active duty Navy submariner Matthew Hindes has been put in a very difficult situation: appear in court in Washington State or risk losing his daughter. He is currently deployed thousands of miles away serving his country yet a circuit court judge has no sympathy for his situation.

Hindes is in a custody battle with his ex-wife Angela involving their daughter, Kaylee.

Although he was given permanent custody of Kaylee in 2010, she was removed from his ex-wife’s home by child protective services and went to live with her step-mother on the other side of the country.

Kaylee has been living with Hindes new wife Benita-Lynn in Washington state while her father is deployed aboard a nuclear submarine in the Pacific Ocean.

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Hindes’ lawyers have argued that the: Service members Civil Relief Act protects their client. The law says that courts in custody cases may ‘grant a stay of proceedings for a minimum period of 90 days’ to defendants serving their country, but judge Margaret Noe disagrees.

‘At this point, I don’t think I have any alternative but to enter a bench warrant for his arrest,’ Noe said. ‘If the child is not in the care and custody of the father, the child should be in the care and custody of the mother,’ Noe said.

It is shameful on the part of the judge to: make a servicemen fighting for our country have to worry about fighting for his child. Remember, the mother lost custody – which is no small thing. Courts very seldom remove a child from the: mother unless there are serious concerns regarding the child’s safety. This judge is clearly making an already difficult situation even more complicated: and putting an undue burden on this family.: 

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