Public Broadcasting Leftists Rake in Huge Salaries


When James O’Keefe pulled a sting operation on Ron Schiller of the left-wing propaganda service National Public Radio, the moonbat admitted not only to hatred of normal Americans and sympathy for Islamic terrorists, but also that NPR did not need any of the taxpayer money it has been bathing in. But the ill-gotten loot is nice to have anyway, when doling out salaries like these:

Fresh Air host / executive producer Terry Gross: $245,563 in 2008

This American Life host Ira Glass: earned $170,605 in 2008

Morning Edition host Renee Montagne: $405,140

Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep: $356,499

All Things Considered anchor Robert Siegel: $358,653

Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon: $364,465

Our money is redistributed to NPR and the comparably malignant PBS by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, whose own execs are also compensated handsomely:

According to CPB’s 2009 tax forms, President and CEO Patricia de Stacy Harrison received $298,884 in reportable compensation and another $70,630 in other compensation from the organization and related organizations that year.

Admittedly that’s not much compared to the $1.2 million in compensation NPR president emeritus Kevin Klose stuffed in his pockets in 2009.

At least now that the explosion of information outlets and the government debt crisis have made it obvious that public broadcasting is both unneeded and unaffordable, these pigs will be shoved away from the public trough, right? Wrong:

In 2001, the federal government appropriated $340 million for CPB. Last year it got $420 million. As Congress considers ways to close the $14 trillion deficit, cutting funding for the CPB has even been proposed by President Obama’s bipartisan deficit reduction commission. Instead, Mr. Obama wants to increase CPB’s funding to $451 million in his latest budget.

Meanwhile, PBS is raking in money from the free market it despises:

“Sesame Street,” for example, made more than $211 million from toy and consumer product sales from 2003-2006.

This — and money stolen from you — explains how they could afford to pay Sesame Workshop President and CEO Gary Knell $956,513 in 2008.

Cutting funding to CPB is a foolish idea. It shouldn’t be cut; it should be eliminated entirely and immediately.

What overpaid public broadcasting propagandists think of you.

On tips from Byron. Cross-posted at Moonbattery.

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